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Remembering D-Day

Allied troops landing on a D-Day beach - June 6, 1944

Allied troops landing on a D-Day beach - June 6, 1944

New Orleans
Saturday, August 2, 2014

A panel of historians discusses the different ways D-Day has been remembered in United States and abroad. In the U.S., D-Day has been widely memorialized through monuments, museums and film. By contrast, in Germany, there is not a single museum marking the D-Day invasion. The panel also looks at how different countries have changed their views on D-Day over the years. For example, in some countries sympathetic to the Nazis, D-Day was originally seen in defeatist terms, but has since come to be viewed as the liberation of Europe. 

Updated: Sunday, August 3, 2014 at 11:08am (ET)

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