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Religious Beliefs of Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale (1805)

Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale (1805)

Charlottesville, Virginia
Wednesday, December 25, 2013

University of Virginia Religious Studies Professor William Wilson argues that the teachings of Jesus were important to Thomas Jefferson as a moral compass, but that Jefferson did not believe in the divinity of Christ.  Professor Wilson also makes the point that Jefferson did believe in the existence of a Supreme Being who was the creator of the universe.  The Thomas Jefferson Heritage Society hosted this seminar on the character and legacy of the third president.  This program took place at the Jefferson Scholars Foundation at the University of Virginia.

Updated: Thursday, December 26, 2013 at 11:30am (ET)

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