All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Reflections on President Kennedy's Assassination

John F. Kennedy's Casket in the White House

John F. Kennedy's Casket in the White House

Dallas, Texas
Saturday, November 16, 2013

This November 22nd marks the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination. Dr. Thomas McConnell, who was the Medical Officer of the Day at the Pentagon on the day JFK was assassinated, talks about his experiences at the White House, the U.S. Capitol and at Arlington National Cemetery in the days after the president’s death. The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas hosted this event. The museum is located in the old Texas School Book Depository which employed Lee Harvey Oswald, the prime suspect in the president’s murder. Evidence that shots were fired from the building’s sixth floor was discovered after the assassination

Updated: Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 12:33pm (ET)

Related Events

Guarding President Kennedy’s Casket
Saturday, July 13, 2013     

Major William Lee relates his experience of guarding John F. Kennedy’s casket after the November, 1963 assassination of the President. As commander of the US Marine Corps’ Silent Drill Platoon, Major Lee helped organize the military ceremonial watch over the President while he lay in the East Wing of the White House and then the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. The retired Marine officer describes how he coped with both his own emotions and the duty at hand. The program was hosted by The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas.

President John F. Kennedy's "Peace Speech"
Sunday, June 9, 2013     

President Kennedy’s commencement address at American University when he called for high-level negotiations with the Soviet Union, a nuclear test ban treaty and an end to the Cold War.  June 10th marks the 50th anniversary of his “Peace Speech” in 1963.

Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza and President Kennedy Assassination
Friday, February 3, 2012     

The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza is located in what was once the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas, the building from which Lee Harvey Oswald shot President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. Museum curator Gary Mack spoke to a tour group led by historian Richard Norton Smith about how the museum presents the information about the assassination and ensuing investigations.

Journalist Walter Mears on President Kennedy
Saturday, November 2, 2013     

Journalist Walter Mears discusses his experiences covering President Kennedy in the 1960s. Mears recalls his time on Kennedy’s campaign and his personal encounters with the President. He also discusses the assassination from his unique viewpoint as a reporter assigned to the President, and the chaotic days following the event. The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas hosted this event. 

The Presidency: Assassination of President Kennedy
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

In the years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963, numerous theories have surfaced about who shot the president and why. In this program, authors David Wrone, Gerald McKnight, David Kaiser and Max Holland dispute each others findings about what really happened in Dallas in 1963.

The War of 1812
Thursday     

Two hundred years ago on August 24th, 1814, British soldiers routed American troops at the Battle of Bladensburg just outside of Washington, DC. The victory left the nation’s capital wide open to British forces, who marched into the city and burned down the White House and U.S. Capitol building. In this program, learn more about the Burning of Washington during the War of 1812 from author and historian Anthony Pitch at an event hosted by the Smithsonian Associates. 

The Civil War: Remembering the Battle of the Crater
Wednesday     

Author Kevin Levin discusses the role of the U.S. Colored Troops in the Battle of the Crater, and the way their contributions were remembered in the years following the Civil War. The Battle of the Crater took place July 30, 1864, as part of the Union Army’s siege of Petersburg.

The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary
Tuesday     

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

The Presidency: Presidents & the CIA
Sunday     

Author and intelligence expert Melvin Goodman describes the history of the relationship between the White House and the Central Intelligence Agency from the Truman years through today. He explains how President Truman's "quiet intelligence arm" became a politicized source of covert actions around the world from the Bay of Pigs invasion to the Iran Contra affair. The National Archives at Kansas City hosted this event. 

A Century Later: Reassessing World War I
Sunday     

World War I officially began on July 28, 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Less than a month later, most of Europe had joined the war. As the world marks the centennial of the beginning of the conflict, the National World War I Museum in Kansas City hosts a panel of historians and authors who talk about the causes and effects of the conflict once known as the “war to end all wars.”

Share This Event Via Social Media
Sundays at Eight - New Book
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org