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Reel America: "The Story of Hoover Dam" - 1955

Interior Department Documentary

Arizona
Sunday, August 31, 2014

This film explains the need to control and regulate the waters of the Colorado River and examines the 1928 passage of the Boulder Canyon Project authorizing construction of the Hoover Dam.  The Interior Dept. documentary portrays the construction of diversion tunnels and then the dam itself, building of support facilities such as a steel fabrication plant for giant pipe construction, and creation of hydroelectric operations that provided electricity to California, Nevada, and Arizona. The film also details how Lake Mead evolved into a successful recreational area as a result of the dam construction. 

Updated: Sunday, August 31, 2014 at 4:55pm (ET)

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