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Reel America: "The Battle of San Pietro" - 1945 & John Huston

Part 5 of 5

Five directors featured on Reel America in June

Five directors featured on Reel America in June

San Pietro, Italy
Sunday, June 29, 2014

The final of a five-part look at Hollywood directors who made films for the U.S. government during World War II features director John Huston and "The Battle of San Pietro" - a 32 minute U.S. Army film depicting the December 1943 battle which destroyed the town of San Pietro, Italy. Praised at the time for a realistic portrayal of a battle that killed over 1,000 Americans, the film was actually composed almost entirely of reenacted scenes.  This program includes commentary by Mark Harris, author of "Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War."

Updated: Friday, August 15, 2014 at 3:34pm (ET)

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