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Reel America: "A Conversation with Herbert Hoover" - 1960

President Herbert Hoover

President Herbert Hoover

Stanford, California
Sunday, August 17, 2014

In this hour-long 1960 NBC interview, Herbert Hoover discusses his life beyond the presidency. Speaking with reporter Ray Henle, he delves into topics including his childhood, his time in China during the Boxer Rebellion and his involvement supplying food to civilians in German-occupied Belgium during WWI. This program is part of the collections of the Stanford University Libraries Department of Special Collections and University Archives.  

Updated: Monday, August 18, 2014 at 8:57am (ET)

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