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Race, History & Teaching the Civil War

Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Saturday, January 25, 2014

In the closing session from the 2013 Civil War conference at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, four of the conference’s presenters consider the modern context of the war. They discuss how it is taught in classrooms, and improvements that could be made to those lessons and stories. They also talk about the war’s ramifications on race relations – the effects of which are still felt and experienced today.

Updated: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 9:47am (ET)

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