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Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck

Depiction of Queen Anne's Revenge

Depiction of Queen Anne's Revenge

Goldsboro, North Carolina
Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Queen Anne’s Revenge was the flagship of Edward Teach, a pirate more commonly known as “Blackbeard.” While sailing along the Atlantic coast in the early 18th century, Blackbeard and his crew ran aground off North Carolina and abandoned the ship. The vessel was finally found in 1996, and soon after the state of North Carolina began excavating the site. Shanna Daniel – a conservator on the project - talks about the history of the ship and some of the artifacts recovered at the site. The Wayne County Museum in Goldsboro, North Carolina hosted this hour-long event.

Updated: Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 11:55am (ET)

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