All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

President Kennedy’s Civil Rights Address

President John F. Kennedy (June 11, 1963)

President John F. Kennedy (June 11, 1963)

Washington, DC
Saturday, June 8, 2013

On June 11, 1963 President John F. Kennedy addressed the nation on Civil Rights.  That spring, civil rights protests in Birmingham, Alabama had been met with violence by police.  And on June 10th, the federal government ordered the Alabama National Guard to protect two African American students attempting to enroll at the University of Alabama.  In his Oval Office address, President Kennedy called on Americans to address a "moral crisis" "and to support congressional action against segregation and discrimination."

Updated: Monday, June 10, 2013 at 9:35am (ET)

Related Events

Civil Rights and Oral History
Saturday, July 28, 2012     

Tom Ikeda of the Japanese American Legacy Project and Jasmine Alinder of the March on Milwaukee digital history project are interviewed at the Organization of American Historians meeting in Milwaukee.  Ikeda and Alinda discuss the historical value of online oral and digital history collections. Mr. Ikeda's project focuses on documenting the experience of the WWII Japanese internment camps, and Professor Alinder is a team member of a project detailing the 1960's civil rights movement in Milwaukee.

Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign: First-Person Accounts
Thursday, May 2, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign in Alabama. The protests gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” This event features first-person accounts of the events in Birmingham that spring, including remarks by those who took part in the children’s protest, as well as student leaders of a boycott of segregated businesses. The discussion took place at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. 

1963 Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign
Saturday, May 4, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham civil rights campaign. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his famed “Letter from Birmingham Jail” after being arrested for taking part in the protests. The campaign gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” A panel of authors and historians recall the turmoil of the time, as well as how Birmingham has chosen to remember its past. This event was part of the Alabama Historical Association’s annual conference.

Lectures in History: Civil Rights Movement 1955-1968
Saturday, June 1, 2013     

Goucher College professor Jean Baker teaches a class on the Civil Right Movement, from Rosa Parks refusal to move to the back of the bus in 1955, to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. The class also engages in a discussion on a book of oral histories by journalist Howell Raines titled, “My Soul is Rested: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement in the Deep South.” Goucher College is in Baltimore, Maryland. This class is an hour and 15 minutes. 

The Building of Washington, DC
Today     

Author Alison Fortier looks at the building of the various historical sites throughout Washington, DC, and the people who helped shape the nation’s capital. The Heritage Foundation hosted this event. 

History Bookshelf: Americanization of Hawaii
Today     

Sarah Vowell, author of "Unfamiliar Fishes," examines the Americanization of Hawaii that began with the arrival of New England missionaries in 1820.

Battle of Bladensburg & Burning of Washington
Today     

A panel of authors and scholars looks back 200 years to the Battle of Bladensburg and the Burning of Washington, DC, which took place August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812.

American Artifacts: Burning of Washington River Tour
Today     

Steve Vogel, author of "Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks that Saved the Nation" tells the story of the August 24, 1814 burning of Washington by taking us on a river tour with his boat.  Mr. Vogel argues that the waterways were key to the British commanders, who thought that capturing and burning the city might bring the War of 1812 to an end.

The Life of Milton Friedman
Today     

Economist Mark Skousen reflects on the life of Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman and his contributions to the study of economics – especially his work to re-establish the American economy following World War II. Skousen also reflects on his personal relationship with Friedman and the economist’s influence on his own career. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event. 

Historical Accuracy of the Movie “Lincoln”
Friday     

Dickinson College professor Matthew Pinsker dissects Stephen Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln,” analyzing what is fact and what is Hollywood fiction. Professor Pinsker goes into detail about the historical significance of the events the movie portrays, but also highlights areas where Mr. Spielberg exercised his artistic freedom. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
Sundays at Eight - New Book
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org