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President Kennedy’s Civil Rights Address

President John F. Kennedy (June 11, 1963)

President John F. Kennedy (June 11, 1963)

Washington, DC
Saturday, June 8, 2013

On June 11, 1963 President John F. Kennedy addressed the nation on Civil Rights.  That spring, civil rights protests in Birmingham, Alabama had been met with violence by police.  And on June 10th, the federal government ordered the Alabama National Guard to protect two African American students attempting to enroll at the University of Alabama.  In his Oval Office address, President Kennedy called on Americans to address a "moral crisis" "and to support congressional action against segregation and discrimination."

Updated: Monday, June 10, 2013 at 9:35am (ET)

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