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President Kennedy’s Berlin Address

President Kennedy in West Berlin, Germany (June 26, 1963)

President Kennedy in West Berlin, Germany (June 26, 1963)

West Berlin, Germany
Monday, July 1, 2013

Fifty years ago on June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy spoke in Berlin on the differences between free and Communist systems, famously stating that as a free man he took pride in the words “Ich bin ein Berliner.”

Updated: Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 4:32pm (ET)

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