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President Clinton Impeachment - 15 Years Later

U.S. Senate Impeachment Trial Tickets

U.S. Senate Impeachment Trial Tickets

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 4, 2014

American History TV looks back 15 years at the impeachment of President William Jefferson Clinton. Watch American History TV every weekend on C-SPAN3.

We show a portion of the U.S. House debate on four articles of impeachment from December 18th and 19th, 1998. The House voted to approve two of those articles, making Bill Clinton only the second president in U.S. history to be impeached – the first was Andrew Johnson in 1868. 

We also show a portion of the proceedings from the U.S. Senate impeachment trial, which took place over five weeks in January and February 1999. The Senate found President Clinton not guilty on both of the impeachment articles considered. 

Joining us to give context to these events is Peter Baker, now chief White House correspondent for the New York Times. He covered the Clinton impeachment for the Washington Post and wrote the book "The Breach: Inside the Impeachment and Trial of William Jefferson Clinton."

Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 8:37pm (ET)

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