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Poverty in America

Hooverville in Bakersfield, California, 1936

Hooverville in Bakersfield, California, 1936

St. Louis
Monday, September 2, 2013

The Great Depression is examined through three unique lenses. First, Margaret Garb looks at some of the well known photographers and journalists who documented the severe poverty in both rural and urban America. Adell Patton brings the experience of rural African-Americans during the Depression to light through his own personal narrative. Later on, John McManus explores how poverty impacted the decision to serve for soldiers in World War II. National Archives in St. Louis hosted this program.
 

Updated: Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at 12:30pm (ET)

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