All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Post-Mortem Photography

Nineteenth-century photo of a recently deceased person

Nineteenth-century photo of a recently deceased person

New York City
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Dr. Stanley Burns explores the 19th century practice of taking photographs of the deceased. He presents a large collection of post-mortem photos, particularly of children taken by their loved ones, which was a common practice at the time.  Dr. Burns has written a book on the subject, and is president of the Burns Archive, a collection of early medical photography. The Museum of the City of New York hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 3:23pm (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Death, Mourning & the Civil War White Houses
Saturday, June 8, 2013     

Author Catherine Clinton discusses how both President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis suffered the loss of a child while in office and how it impacted their wives. In 1862, the Lincolns lost their 11-year old son, Willie, from what was believed to be typhoid fever. In1864, the Davises lost their four-year old son, Joseph, in a fatal fall at the Confederate White House in Richmond. Professor Clinton also explores mid-19th century mourning practices and etiquette. The National Archives in Washington, DC, hosted this event.
 

Slavery and Emancipation in Photographs
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

The National Archives hosted this look at how newly freed slaves were portrayed in photographs after the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of the Civil War. We also see photographs from before the war that help distinguish how African Americans were later depicted.

Photographs of the Great Depression
Sunday, July 7, 2013     

A look at historical photographs taken during the Great Depression, and how these iconic images shape the way we remember that period. We hear from University of Missouri Art Professor Dan Younger who focuses on the work of 20th century American photographers Arthur Rothstein, Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine. Their photographs document American life and hardships during that era. This event took place at the National Archives in St. Louis. 

The Civil War: Photos of African American Soldiers
Saturday, March 16, 2013     

This is a look at the names, people and stories behind the photographs of black Americans who fought for the Union. Ron Coddington -- author of the book “African American Faces of the Civil War” – details their contributions to the war effort.  The New York Public Library hosted this discussion.

American Artifacts: History of Printing
Sunday, November 18, 2012     

Eighty-three year-old Ray Loomis has worked in the printing industry since he was 15 years old. American History TV visited the Baltimore Museum of Industry where's he's a volunteer to see a demonstration of historic printing methods and machines, including the revolutionary Linotype, which was invented in Baltimore by German immigrant Ottmar Mergenthaler.

American Artifacts: 1930s-40s Color Photographs (Part 1)
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

During the Great Depression & World War II, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration and later the Office of War Information created about 1,600 color photographs documenting agricultural life & war production in the United States. American History TV visited the Library of Congress to learn about the collection from curator Beverly Brannan. 

American Artifacts: 1930s-40s Color Photographs (Part 2)
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

In this second of a two-part look at U.S. Government funded color photographs from the Library of Congress, we feature images created for the Office of War Information in the 1940’s. Photographers were assigned to travel the United States and document war production efforts.  Our guide is Curator of Photography Beverly Brannan.

Watergate & President Nixon’s Fall From Power
Wednesday     

To mark the 40th anniversary of President Nixon's August 9, 1974 resignation, the Washington Post hosted a discussion on Watergate, secret White House tapes and the 37th president's fall from power. 

Watergate 40 Years Later: Nixon House Impeachment Hearings - July 1974 Article II Debate
Sunday     

Forty years ago, the House Judiciary Committee held hearings to consider articles of impeachment against President Nixon. We see the committee's evening session debate over Article II, which charged the president with abuse of power. First, Timothy Naftali, former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, explains why Article II was at the heart of the impeachment proceedings, and how the committee's vote continues to shape our understanding of presidential power.

Life & Career of Senator Alben Barkley
Sunday     

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks about the life of fellow Kentuckian Senator Alben Barkley, who was majority leader of the U.S. Senate between 1937 and 1947; and was Minority Leader from 1947 to 1949. A Democrat, Alben Barkley was the 35th Vice President of the United States, elected with Harry Truman in 1949. This program is part of a series of talks by Mitch McConnell about former U.S. Senators from Kentucky.    

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

Washington Journal (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org