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Post-Mortem Photography

Nineteenth-century photo of a recently deceased person

Nineteenth-century photo of a recently deceased person

New York City
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Dr. Stanley Burns explores the 19th century practice of taking photographs of the deceased. He presents a large collection of post-mortem photos, particularly of children taken by their loved ones, which was a common practice at the time.  Dr. Burns has written a book on the subject, and is president of the Burns Archive, a collection of early medical photography. The Museum of the City of New York hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 3:23pm (ET)

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