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Politics, the Supreme Court & the Dred Scott Decision

Dred Scott Portrait (Louis Schultze)

Dred Scott Portrait (Louis Schultze)

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, August 10, 2013

Earl Maltz, author of the book “Dred Scott and the Politics of Slavery,” details the political atmosphere in the U.S. leading up to the Dred Scott Supreme Court case, and argues that the decision in 1857 was one of the worst in the Court’s history. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Updated: Saturday, August 10, 2013 at 1:28pm (ET)

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