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Photographs of the Great Depression

Arthur Rothstein Photo - Fleeing a Dust Storm, Oklahoma, 1936

Arthur Rothstein Photo - Fleeing a Dust Storm, Oklahoma, 1936

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 7, 2013

A look at historical photographs taken during the Great Depression, and how these iconic images shape the way we remember that period. We hear from University of Missouri Art Professor Dan Younger who focuses on the work of 20th century American photographers Arthur Rothstein, Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine. Their photographs document American life and hardships during that era. This event took place at the National Archives in St. Louis. 

Updated: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 4:57pm (ET)

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