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Philosophy & Politics of Roe v. Wade

Princeton, New Jersey
Saturday, August 24, 2013

Political science and law professors evaluate the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision, Roe v. Wade. They critique the Court’s opinion and consider the politics surrounding the case. Princeton University’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, and the Association for the Study of Free Institutions cosponsored this event.
 

Updated: Monday, August 26, 2013 at 10:41am (ET)

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