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Personal Perspectives of the JFK Assassination

Austin, Texas
Saturday, December 21, 2013

Sid Davis, Julian Read, Ben Barnes, and Larry Temple were all riding with the presidential motorcade in Dallas when President Kennedy was assassinatedon November 22nd, 1963. In this program, these four men give their eyewitness accounts of the chaotic and tragic events of that day, from President Kennedy’s jubilant arrival in Dallas to Lyndon Johnson solemnly taking the Oath of Office on Air Force One. This event was held at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas, and co-sponsored by the Briscoe Center for American History.

Updated: Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 2:03pm (ET)

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