All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Parallel Lives of Mickey Mantle & Willie Mays

New York City
Saturday, September 21, 2013

Sportswriter Allen Barra discusses the baseball careers of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays. He argues that the players had much in common—both were born in 1931 in the South, and both were rookies in New York in 1951. Despite their difference in skin color, they became friends and often participated in ad campaigns together. The Museum of the City of New York hosted this event.

Updated: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 10:15pm (ET)

Related Events

Baseball and the Presidency
Sunday, May 30, 2010     

From Harrison to Obama, in peacetime and in war, baseball has long been an established tradition of Presidents sitting in the White House. Baseball historian Mel Marmer talked about this unique relationship recently at the F.D.R. Library in Hyde Park, New York.

Lectures in History: The Integration of Baseball
Saturday, September 3, 2011     

Terumi Rafferty-Osaki is an adjunct history professor at American University with expertise in immigration and civil rights. In this week’s class, he talks to students about how African Americans, women and Asians integrated baseball.

Baseball Heroes of World War II
Sunday, December 5, 2010     

The American Veterans Center and the Washington Nationals recently hosted a group of former Major League Baseball Players to talk about their military service during World War Two. Among them are New York Yankees Hall of Fame catcher Yogi Berra, Tuskegee Airman John "Mule" Miles who played in the Negro League, and San Diego Padres broadcaster Jerry Coleman.

Jackie Robinson's Baseball Career
Saturday, May 25, 2013     

This is the story of the first African American major league baseball player in the modern era, Jackie Robinson. Raymond Doswell of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum focuses on Robinson’s athletic career, his ability to steal bases and home plate, and the racism and obstacles he faced. Over the course of his ten-season Major League career between 1947 & 1956, Robinson played in six World Series and was selected for six All-Star games. His achievements are widely viewed as an important contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. This event was hosted by the National Archives at Kansas City in Missouri.

National Press Clubs Hosts Baseball Insiders
Wednesday, April 11, 2012     

Major League Baseball Players Association Executive Director Michael Weiner discusses the future of collective bargaining in baseball Wednesday at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Baseball Players and owners reached a new five-year labor deal in November that increases the minimum player salary to $480,000

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Multiracial Coalitions & Civil Rights
Sunday     

A former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joins author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

Reel America: "A Time for Choosing" - 1964
Sunday     

On October 27, 1964, future president Ronald Reagan delivered a 30-minute television campaign speech for Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Later titled the "A Time for Choosing" speech, it raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the Goldwater campaign and helped launch Reagan's political career.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN on Facebook (late 2012)