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Parallel Lives of Mickey Mantle & Willie Mays

New York City
Saturday, September 21, 2013

Sportswriter Allen Barra discusses the baseball careers of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays. He argues that the players had much in common—both were born in 1931 in the South, and both were rookies in New York in 1951. Despite their difference in skin color, they became friends and often participated in ad campaigns together. The Museum of the City of New York hosted this event.

Updated: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 10:15pm (ET)

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