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Pacific Theater of World War II

U.S. troops attack Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima

U.S. troops attack Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima

Washington, DC
Sunday, November 10, 2013

In this program, hear from two World War II veterans about their experience in the Pacific Theater. Both of the men are U.S. Marines who fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima. They spoke at the American Veterans Center annual conference in Washington, DC.

Updated: Monday, November 18, 2013 at 10:43am (ET)

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