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Origins of the Cell Phone

Martin Cooper

Martin Cooper

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 30, 2014

In 1973, Martin Cooper, a Motorola researcher, invented the first cell phone—the DynaTAC. He is also the first person ever to make a call on a cell phone. Art Molella, the director of the Smithsonian Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, talks to Cooper about the evolution and history of his invention. Cooper is currently the chairman of Dyna, LLC.

Updated: Monday, March 31, 2014 at 9:58am (ET)

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