All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Origins of U.S. Military Academy at West Point

View of West Point, 1831

View of West Point, 1831

New York City
Saturday, January 25, 2014

On March 16, 1802, Congress formally authorized the United States American Military Academy at West Point on the Hudson River in New York. West Point instructor Major Andrew Forney discusses how in the wake of the revolution many founding fathers debated the concept of creating a military school in a republic. In this talk, Major Forney explores both sides of this discussion and attitudes regarding the military in the post-revolutionary years. The New York Military Affairs Symposium hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 9:50am (ET)

Related Events

West Point & Football
Saturday, December 1, 2012     

Author Joe Drape discusses how he researched his book, “Soldiers First: Duty, Honor, Country and Football at West Point.” He also talks about how the experience of attending West Point impacted many of the institution’s more famous alumni, such as President Dwight Eisenhower, who played on the school’s football team. The Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum and the Eisenhower Foundation co-hosted this event.

The Civil War: Studying Military History
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

History professor Gary Gallagher speaks about the importance of studying military history in the last of a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

The Civil War: Race & Military Tradition
Saturday, November 24, 2012     

Author and historian Mark Grimsley explains how American military conflicts through history have contributed to the formation and understanding of racial identities. He discusses the roles of African Americans on both the Union and Confederate sides of the Civil War. Mr. Grimsley spoke at the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

Native American Military History
Sunday, February 17, 2013     

Colorado Mesa University professor Timothy Winegard discusses the history of Native Americans and their involvement in American and Canadian wars. He also talks about the image of the “Indian Warrior” and misleading stereotypes in American films and memory. This event took place at the History Colorado Center in Denver.
 

Military Production During World War II
Monday, October 14, 2013     

Marine Corps War College strategic studies professor Jim Lacey talks about his book, “Keep From All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won World War II.” He details the decisions economists and generals made to guide and sustain military production during the war. The New York Military Affairs Symposium and the Soldiers’, Sailors’, Marines’, Coast Guard and Airmen’s Club hosted this event.

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Multiracial Coalitions & Civil Rights
Sunday     

A former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joins author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

Reel America: "A Time for Choosing" - 1964
Sunday     

On October 27, 1964, future president Ronald Reagan delivered a 30-minute television campaign speech for Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Later titled the "A Time for Choosing" speech, it raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the Goldwater campaign and helped launch Reagan's political career.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN on Facebook (late 2012)