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Origins of U.S. Military Academy at West Point

View of West Point, 1831

View of West Point, 1831

New York City
Saturday, January 25, 2014

On March 16, 1802, Congress formally authorized the United States American Military Academy at West Point on the Hudson River in New York. West Point instructor Major Andrew Forney discusses how in the wake of the revolution many founding fathers debated the concept of creating a military school in a republic. In this talk, Major Forney explores both sides of this discussion and attitudes regarding the military in the post-revolutionary years. The New York Military Affairs Symposium hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 9:50am (ET)

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