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Oral Histories: U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka

Sen. Daniel Akaka

Sen. Daniel Akaka

Washington, DC
Saturday, September 29, 2012

An oral history interview with Senator Daniel Akaka of Hawaii – the first U.S. Senator with Native Hawaiian ancestry. He was an eyewitness to the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and served during World War II with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. He was first elected to Congress in 1976 as a U.S. Representative. The U.S. Capitol Historical Society and Heritage Series conducted this interview.

Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012 at 11:02am (ET)

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