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Oral Histories: Norman Mineta

Preview Oral Histories Norm Mineta

Preview Oral Histories Norm Mineta

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 5, 2011

Norman Mineta’s family was among the 110,000 Japanese Americans relocated to internment camps following President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signature of Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. Later in life, Mr. Mineta served in Congress and as a cabinet secretary to Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. In this oral history conducted for “Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project,” he details efforts to seek redress for Japanese Americans.

Updated: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at 4:28pm (ET)

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