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Oral Histories: Louis Stokes

Louis Stokes on the Congressional Black Caucus

Louis Stokes on the Congressional Black Caucus

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 22, 2011

Louis Stokes was elected to the U.S. Congress from Ohio in 1969 and served for 30 years – a record tenure, at the time, for an African-American in the House of Representatives. In this oral history from the collection of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Stokes details his journey from a Depression era childhood in Cleveland to the halls of Congress. And he recalls the founding of the caucus – which marks its 40th anniversary in 2011 – and early strategies to gain political power and influence.

Updated: Monday, January 17, 2011 at 6:05pm (ET)

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