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Oral Histories: John Conyers

Rep. John Conyers (D-MI)

Rep. John Conyers (D-MI)

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 29, 2011

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. of Michigan first entered the House of Representatives in 1965 and is now considered the dean of the Congressional Black Caucus – which marks its 40th anniversary in 2011. In this oral history from the collection of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Conyers discusses his long political career, including the story behind the creation of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.

Updated: Monday, January 31, 2011 at 11:19am (ET)

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