All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Oral Histories: John Conyers

Rep. John Conyers (D-MI)

Rep. John Conyers (D-MI)

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 29, 2011

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. of Michigan first entered the House of Representatives in 1965 and is now considered the dean of the Congressional Black Caucus – which marks its 40th anniversary in 2011. In this oral history from the collection of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Conyers discusses his long political career, including the story behind the creation of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.

Updated: Monday, January 31, 2011 at 11:19am (ET)

Related Events

Congressional Black Caucus Oral History Project
Saturday, January 1, 2011     

Oral Histories: Louis Stokes
Saturday, January 22, 2011     

Louis Stokes was elected to the U.S. Congress from Ohio in 1969 and served for 30 years – a record tenure, at the time, for an African-American in the House of Representatives. In this oral history from the collection of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Stokes details his journey from a Depression era childhood in Cleveland to the halls of Congress. And he recalls the founding of the caucus – which marks its 40th anniversary in 2011 – and early strategies to gain political power and influence.

Oral Histories: Charles Rangel
Saturday, January 8, 2011     

Charles Rangel entered the Congress as a representative from New York in 1971 and eventually served as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. He lost that position after ethics violation charges surfaced – and his colleagues voted in early December 2010 to censure him. In this oral history from the collection of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Rangel recalls his political career and the founding of the caucus – which marks its 40th anniversary in 2011.

Oral Histories: Walter Fauntroy
Saturday, January 15, 2011     

The Rev. Walter Fauntroy served as the District of Columbia’s first delegate to Congress from 1971 to 1991, and was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus. In this oral history from the collection of the CBC Foundation, Fauntroy talks about his civil rights work and his political career.

Oral Histories: Yvonne Brathwaite-Burke
Saturday, January 1, 2011     

Yvonne Brathwaite Burke served in the United States House of Representatives from California in the 1970s. In this never before televised oral history from the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, she recalls the work of the caucus, her efforts on behalf of displaced homemakers, and an unlikely political battle to save the Capitol beauty shop for working women.

The Presidency: Ronald Reagan's Legacy
Sunday     

Former President Ronald Reagan died at 93 in June 2004. To commemorate the 10th anniversary, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library hosted a discussion about the 40th president’s legacy. Panelists included Reagan biographer Lou Cannon and Reagan speech writer Peggy Noonan.   

Pilgrim Leader William Brewster’s Home
Sunday     

Author Sue Allan discusses Scrooby Manor, the home of Pilgrim leader William Brewster before he left England on the Mayflower for the New World. This was hosted by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants. 

Reel America: "Oil Across Arabia" - 1950
Sunday     

This Bechtel Corporation film documents the 1947 to 1950 development of a Saudi Arabian oil pipeline constructed by American companies in cooperation with Saudi Arabia.  The 1,000 mile pipeline by-passed the need for a 3,000 mile oil tanker journey around Saudio Arabia to the Suez Canal. This pipeline ceased all operations in 1990.

Star-Spangled Banner 200th Anniversary
Sunday     

In this program, we take you to Fort McHenry in Baltimore for a ceremony commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner. The event includes remarks by former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Also, a flag-raising at the exact time 200 years ago that Francis Scott Key saw a large American flag hoisted above the fort, signaling the garrison had survived an all-night bombardment by the British Navy. That moment on September 14, 1814, inspired Key to compose what would later become our National Anthem, and the American victory became a turning point in the War of 1812. 

American Artifacts: Birth of the Star-Spangled Banner
Sunday     

In this "American Artifacts" program, we visit Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine in Baltimore to learn about the birth of the Star-Spangled Banner. The year 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the British naval bombardment of the fort during the War of 1812. The raising of the garrison flag over the fort on the morning after the barrage inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words that later became our national anthem. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
Washington Journal (late 2012)