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Oral Histories: Francis O'Brien

New York City
Tuesday, July 3, 2012

The Richard Nixon Presidential Library has released interviews with key staff charged with investigating whether there were grounds to impeach President Nixon.  This oral history is with Francis O’Brien, chief of staff to Congressman Peter Rodino, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974.

Updated: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 at 3:40pm (ET)

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