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Oral Histories: Dorothy Cotton

Ithaca, New York
Saturday, August 31, 2013

At the direction of Congress, the voices and experiences from the Civil Rights Movement of the mid-20th century are being documented in an oral history project. This effort is a collaboration of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, the Library of Congress and the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. American History TV on C-SPAN 3  is televising them for the first time. In this interview, Dorothy Cotton -- former education director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference -- talks about the SCLC's early days, her work alongside Martin Luther King Jr. and the impact of his assassination on the civil rights organization.

Updated: Saturday, August 31, 2013 at 11:01am (ET)

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