All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Oral Histories: Dorothy Cotton

Ithaca, New York
Saturday, August 31, 2013

At the direction of Congress, the voices and experiences from the Civil Rights Movement of the mid-20th century are being documented in an oral history project. This effort is a collaboration of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, the Library of Congress and the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. American History TV on C-SPAN 3  is televising them for the first time. In this interview, Dorothy Cotton -- former education director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference -- talks about the SCLC's early days, her work alongside Martin Luther King Jr. and the impact of his assassination on the civil rights organization.

Updated: Saturday, August 31, 2013 at 11:01am (ET)

Related Events

Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Saturday, January 15, 2011     

Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on January 15th, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia.  He was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4th, 1968. A Congressional ceremony honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. occurred in April 2008, marking the 40th anniversary of King’s assassination. Speaking at the event are Representatives Nancy Pelosi, John Boehner and John Lewis; Senators Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell, and Martin Luther King, Junior’s eldest son Martin Luther King the 3rd.

Mentors to Martin Luther King, Jr.
Tuesday, January 17, 2012     

Howard Thurman and Benjamin Mays were both mentors to civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Saturday, April 2, 2011     

Hampton Sides recounts the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and profiles his assassin, James Earl Ray. The author details Ray's escape from the Missouri State Penitentiary in 1967, his travels throughout the South, Mexico, and Los Angeles under the assumed name Eric Galt, and his assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., at the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis on April 4, 1968. Following the assassination the FBI conducted a sixty-five day manhunt. Hampton Sides presented his book at the Free Library of Philadelphia.

Lyndon Johnson & Martin Luther King, Jr.
Saturday, May 14, 2011     

The Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia hosted a discussion about the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and his relationship with President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Lectures in History: Martin Luther King Jr. in Birmingham, Alabama
Monday, January 21, 2013     

University of Hartford professor Warren Goldstein discusses Martin Luther King, Jr.'s time spent in Birmingham, Alabama, and the Civil Rights movement there in 1963.

The Presidency: Nixon & the National Security Council
Today     

Former members of President Nixon's National Security Council discuss his efforts to form a comprehensive, efficient national security policy that drew on the government’s diplomatic resources. This event was co-hosted by the National Archives and the Richard Nixon Foundation. 

American Artifacts: Warren Commission Records
Today     

Investigative Journalist Philip Shenon discusses lingering controversies surrounding the Warren Report, presented to President Lyndon Johnson on September, 24, 1964 & released to the public three days later. This interview examines phone calls, documents, and artifacts and was recorded in a conference room used by the Warren Commission at the Washington, DC office of the VFW. Mr. Shenon's book, "A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination" is the result of five years of work and details the Commission's nine-month investigation. 

Reel America: "November 22nd & the Warren Report"
Today     

A CBS special report from the day the Warren Report was released to the public. It includes interviews with those who knew Lee Harvey Oswald best, including his wife and his mother, as well as those who witnessed the assassination and the aftermath on the streets of Dallas.

Congressional History
Today     

A panel of political scientists explores questions regarding the history of the United States Congress, such as when Senate floor leadership first emerged and the impact of party politics. 

The Civil War: Fall of Atlanta
Saturday     

Author Stephen Davis discusses the Fall of Atlanta. He highlights the role of the four commanders who had the greatest impact on the Atlanta campaign: Confederates John Bell Hood and Joseph E. Johnston, and Union leaders William Tecumseh Sherman and George Thomas. Atlanta fell to Union forces on September 2, 1864, bringing General Sherman’s four-month-long campaign to a close. The Lovett School, Atlanta History Center & Jack & Anne Glenn Character Education Speakers Foundation co-hosted this event.

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV