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New York's Year of Anarchy: 1914

New York City
Sunday, March 2, 2014

Bard College historian Thai Jones talks about the social unrest that erupted in 1914 New York City under Mayor John Purroy Mitchel – a reform minded Democrat who was undone by his mismanagement of a major snowstorm as well as by a series of civil liberty violations. Professor Jones is the author of “More Powerful Than Dynamite: Radicals, Plutocrats, Progressives, and New York’s Year of Anarchy.” The New York Public Library sponsored this event.

Updated: Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10:45am (ET)

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