All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

New York's Year of Anarchy: 1914

New York City
Sunday, March 2, 2014

Bard College historian Thai Jones talks about the social unrest that erupted in 1914 New York City under Mayor John Purroy Mitchel – a reform minded Democrat who was undone by his mismanagement of a major snowstorm as well as by a series of civil liberty violations. Professor Jones is the author of “More Powerful Than Dynamite: Radicals, Plutocrats, Progressives, and New York’s Year of Anarchy.” The New York Public Library sponsored this event.

Updated: Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10:45am (ET)

Related Events

Jewish Immigrants in New York City 1840-1920
Saturday, March 9, 2013     

Using photographs and first person accounts read by actors, co-authors Annie Polland and Daniel Soyer describe how New York City influenced Jewish immigrants, and how the immigrants in turn transformed the city. Their book “Emerging Metropolis: New York Jews in the Age of Immigration 1840-1920” is part of a NYU Press series called “City of Promises.” This event is from the New York Museum of Jewish Heritage.

FDR, La Guardia and the Making of Modern New York
Saturday, October 26, 2013     

This is a discussion about the political alliance between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and New York mayor Fiorello La Guardia and how their partnership changed the landscape of the city. Their shared ideology and close personal relationship resulted in such Depression-era public works projects as the Lincoln Tunnel and La Guardia Airport. Mason Williams – author of “City of Ambition: FDR, La Guardia and the Making of Modern New York” – details how New York became a hub of New Deal activity under their stewardship.

The Civil War: New York City Draft Riots
Saturday, December 7, 2013     

From 2013’s Lincoln Forum Symposium in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, author Barnet Schecter talks about the causes, progression, and consequences of the New York City Draft Riots of July 1863. Lincoln Forum vice chairman Harold Holzer serves as moderator.

New York City During the Gilded Age
Wednesday, December 25, 2013     

Architectural historian Barry Lewis explores New York City during the Gilded Age. Mr. Lewis argues that there were two eras of the Gilded Age, the first beginning after the Civil War, where new money brought large homes to the city. The second started in the early 20th century and lasted until the First World War. Like the first period, it was also defined by the rich showing off their wealth, but in a simpler way. The New-York Historical Society hosted this illustrated talk.

Presidential Vacations
Monday     

American History TV interviewed Lawrence Knutson, author of “Away from the White House: Presidential Escapes, Retreats, and Vacations” about the history and politics of presidential getaways. We feature archival footage released by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library of President Kennedy summering in Cape Cod. 

Causes of the Vietnam War
Monday     

A panel of Vietnam veterans and scholars reflect on the events leading up to the Vietnam War and whether it was a necessary conflict for America. The speakers also discuss what it was like being in the war, both from the American and Vietnamese points of view. The Vietnam Veterans for Factual History organized this event.

Senator Sam Ervin and Watergate
Sunday     

We hear about Senator Sam Ervin’s time as chair of the Senate Watergate Committee from his former aide Rufus Edmisten and his grandson, Judge Sam Ervin IV. They recall Ervin’s character and how the self-proclaimed country lawyer relied on his knowledge of the law and personal convictions to guide the Senate Watergate Committee.  

The Presidency: Bush v. Gore & the 2000 Election
Sunday     

A conversation about the 2000 presidential election and the resulting Supreme Court case, Bush v. Gore. In a 5-4 decision, the court ruled in favor of Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush – and against his Democratic challenger, Vice President Al Gore. At issue was the tabulation of Florida’s votes. Panelists include lawyers from both sides of the case, as well as the Palm Beach County elections supervisor who oversaw the recount in that area. The St. Thomas University Ethics Center and the Miami-Dade Commission on Ethics and Public Trust hosted this event.

Chief Justice John Roberts: Magna Carta 800th Anniversary
Sunday     

From the American Bar Association's annual meeting, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts discusses the history and significance of Magna Carta as we approach its 800th anniversary in 2015.

The Life of Milton Friedman
Sunday     

Economist Mark Skousen reflects on the life of Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman and his contributions to the study of economics – especially his work to re-establish the American economy following World War II. Skousen also reflects on his personal relationship with Friedman and the economist’s influence on his own career. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Photo Gallery

C-SPAN Radio