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New York Times v. Sullivan 50th Anniversary

The New York Times ad that sparked the case

The New York Times ad that sparked the case

Athens, Georgia
Monday, December 9, 2013

In the 1964 Supreme Court Case New York Times v. Sullivan, an Alabama safety commissioner sued the newspaper over an ad that described the Alabama police’s violence against civil rights protestors. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of the New York Times, and thus strengthened the press against accusations of libel and defamation. Next, a panel of lawyers and journalists will discuss the importance and legacy of New York Times v. Sullivan, as well as the history of the Supreme Court reporting. This event was held at the University of Georgia to mark the 50th anniversary of New York Times v. Sullivan.

Updated: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 1:02pm (ET)

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