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New York City's Pennsylvania Station

Pennsylvania Station's Main Waiting Room

Pennsylvania Station's Main Waiting Room

New York City
Saturday, January 12, 2013

New York City’s Pennsylvania Station opened in 1910 and was the first all-electric, long-distance train station in America. The noted architecture firm of McKim, Mead and White was charge of the design, and the building was widely considered a Beaux Arts masterpiece. Architectural historian Barry Lewis tells the story of Pennsylvania Station, from its development in the early 1900s, through its demolition and the remodeling of its remaining below-ground sections in the 1960s. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event.

Updated: Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 5:38pm (ET)

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