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New York City During the Gilded Age

Waldorf Astoria Hotel

Waldorf Astoria Hotel

New York City
Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Architectural historian Barry Lewis explores New York City during the Gilded Age. Mr. Lewis argues that there were two eras of the Gilded Age, the first beginning after the Civil War, where new money brought large homes to the city. The second started in the early 20th century and lasted until the First World War. Like the first period, it was also defined by the rich showing off their wealth, but in a simpler way. The New-York Historical Society hosted this illustrated talk.

Updated: Thursday, December 26, 2013 at 10:21am (ET)

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