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National Statuary Hall Collection

Statuary Hall

Statuary Hall

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 5, 2013

U.S. Capitol Historical Society associate historian William diGiacomantonio leads a virtual tour of Statuary Hall. He discusses how states decide on their submissions to the National Statuary Hall Collection, and points out themes that have emerged from his study of the statues.

Updated: Monday, October 7, 2013 at 11:10am (ET)

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