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National Park Service & Historical Interpretation

National Park Service Chief Historian Robert Sutton in Milwaukee

National Park Service Chief Historian Robert Sutton in Milwaukee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Saturday, May 5, 2012

Chief Historian of the National Park Service Robert Sutton discusses how his organization is telling history in new ways by including more information about civilians and non-military events.

Updated: Monday, May 7, 2012 at 1:52pm (ET)

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