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National Action Network Hosts Martin Luther King Jr. Prayer Breakfast

(AP Graphic)

(AP Graphic)

Washington, DC
Monday, January 17, 2011

Education Secretary Arne Duncan joins Rev. Al Sharpton for the National Action Network’s Martin Luther King Day prayer breakfast. The breakfast will focus on the late reverend’s legacy and the future of civil rights in America. Other speakers include EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson and Washington, DC Mayor Vincent Gray.

Updated: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 at 2:59pm (ET)

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