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Military Production During World War II

New York City
Monday, October 14, 2013

Marine Corps War College strategic studies professor Jim Lacey talks about his book, “Keep From All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won World War II.” He details the decisions economists and generals made to guide and sustain military production during the war. The New York Military Affairs Symposium and the Soldiers’, Sailors’, Marines’, Coast Guard and Airmen’s Club hosted this event.

Updated: Friday, October 18, 2013 at 1:30pm (ET)

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