All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Military Career of General Creighton Abrams

New York City
Sunday, February 16, 2014

Military historian and retired lieutenant colonel Lewis Sorley talks about his book “Thunderbolt: General Creighton Abrams and the Army of His Times.” In the lecture, Colonel Sorley chronicles the life and career of General Abrams, who was military commander for the last five years of the Vietnam War. He argues that Abrams is America’s greatest general since Ulysses S. Grant.  Sorley focuses on his military career from World War II, where Abrams was a tank commander who earned the Distinguished Service Cross, to Vietnam, where he oversaw the withdrawal of most U.S. Army forces. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event.         

Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 9:31am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
Saturday, February 8, 2014     

Author and professor Jean Edward Smith discusses the military career of Ulysses S. Grant, from his entry into West Point through his service and leadership of Union forces in the Civil War. He talks about Grant’s feelings on military service, his leadership style, and his many successes and failures. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event.

General George Washington's Defeat at the Battle of Brandywine
Monday, December 30, 2013     

Author Bruce Mowday talks about the Battle of Brandywine – a lesser known American Revolutionary War battle which ended in a British victory over General George Washington at Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania in what was the largest land battle of the conflict.

History of Fort Myers, Florida
Today     

C-SPAN's Local Content Vehicles take American History TV on the road. We feature the history of Fort Myers, Florida over the weekend of April 19-21. 

Lectures in History: Jews in the Progressive Era
Saturday     

Georgetown University Professor Jonathan Ray looks at the lives of American Jews in the Progressive Era, including questions about Jewish assimilation into the wider American culture. He discusses Jewish support of socialism and organized labor, as well as issues of discrimination against Jews in the workplace and in society. He also examines ethnic, racial and religious differences within the Jewish community itself. 

The Search for Missing World War II Servicemen
Saturday     

Author and New York Times Magazine contributing writer, Wil Hylton talks about his book, “Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II." According to Mr. Hylton, the United States is committed to bringing all service members home – even though there are some 83,000 missing. 73,000 of the missing were World War II servicemen. In this talk, Mr. Hylton tells the story of the search for one American bomber plane that disappeared over the tiny Pacific island of Palau in 1944 and he also describes the work being done to find all the missing of World War II. This event was hosted by the New York Public Library. 

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Saturday     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

History Bookshelf: Capturing Jonathan Pollard
Saturday     

Former counterintelligence agent Ronald Olive discusses his book, “Capturing Jonathan Pollard: How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice,” which recounts the events leading up to the arrest of the American intelligence analyst convicted of selling secrets to Israel in 1985.

U.S. Capitol Grounds in Spring
Thursday     

Architect of the U.S. Capitol Stephen Ayers talks about the U.S. Capitol grounds in springtime.

George Washington's "New Room" Restoration
Sunday, April 13, 2014     

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Civil Rights Summit - President Speeches
Sunday, April 13, 2014     

President Obama was joined last week by three predecessors – Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was signed into law by President Johnson. They each delivered remarks at the Civil Rights Summit hosted by the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Washington Journal (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org