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Media, Memory and the March on Washington

March on Washington Leaders on steps of Lincoln Memorial, 1963

March on Washington Leaders on steps of Lincoln Memorial, 1963

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 25, 2013

To mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, panelists gathered at the Newseum in Washington, DC to examine media coverage of the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr.'s “I Have a Dream” speech. They debate whether the march-- and King himself-- received too much attention at the expense of other key civil rights events and leaders. The National Communication Association and Newseum Institute co-hosted this program.

Updated: Monday, December 30, 2013 at 10:14am (ET)

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