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Mary Todd Lincoln Reconsidered

Washington, DC
Saturday, June 15, 2013

Many historians disagree about Mary Todd Lincoln - some call her corrupt and mentally unstable, while others defend her as an intelligent and politically savvy woman who played a vital role in her husband’s presidency. Author and retired Rhode Island Supreme Court Justice Frank Williams details the controversies, the former first lady’s life and assesses how historians have remembered her. This talk took place at President Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC.

Updated: Monday, June 17, 2013 at 10:45am (ET)

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