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Martin Luther King Jr. Interview by Robert Penn Warren

Martin Luther King, Jr. & Robert Penn Warren

Martin Luther King, Jr. & Robert Penn Warren

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 15, 2014

Poet and novelist Robert Penn Warren interviewed Martin Luther King Jr. 50 years ago—on March 18, 1964—while researching his 1965 book, "Who Speaks for the Negro?"  This audio interview is copyrighted by the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries. It is part of the Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Project. 

Updated: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 8:29am (ET)

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