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Martha Jefferson Randolph

Martha Jefferson Randolph

Martha Jefferson Randolph

Richmond, Virginia
Monday, February 18, 2013

Martha Jefferson Randolph, Thomas Jefferson's oldest daughter, is the subject of a biography by George Mason University history professor Cynthia Kierner. Here Kierner discusses Martha's relationship with famous politicians, her struggles with her family's bankruptcy, and how she helped shape Jefferson's legacy. The name of the book is "Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello," and this event was hosted by the Virginia Historical Society.

Updated: Monday, February 25, 2013 at 9:06am (ET)

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