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Mark Twain’s Writings on Native Americans

Samuel Clemens

Samuel Clemens

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Sunday, May 5, 2013

Yale history professor Ned Blackhawk discusses the early western writings of Samuel Clemens, who first used the pen name Mark Twain in 1863 while working in Nevada Territory as a journalist. Professor Blackhawk examines Mark Twain’s attitude toward indigenous people between 1861 and 1866. This program was hosted the University of New Mexico.

Updated: Monday, May 6, 2013 at 12:34pm (ET)

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