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Malaria and Yellow Fever in the Americas

Yellow Fever Experiments at U.S. Army Hospital in Cuba, 1900

Yellow Fever Experiments at U.S. Army Hospital in Cuba, 1900

Washington, DC
Saturday, November 2, 2013

During the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, more men died from disease than from battle wounds during wars in North America & the Caribbean. At the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC, historian John McNeill discusses two of the deadliest diseases from the time; malaria and yellow fever. Professor McNeill argues that rebellious colonists in the American Revolution and rebellious slaves in the Haitian Revolution benefited from their built up resistance to these diseases. This program was hosted by the Woodrow Wilson Center, the National History Center and the American Historical Association.

Updated: Saturday, November 2, 2013 at 12:29pm (ET)

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