All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Main Poc & the War of 1812

Battle of Thames, 1813

Battle of Thames, 1813

Charleston, South Carolina
Saturday, March 16, 2013

History professor R. David Edmunds talks about the biography and legacy of Main Poc, a Native American Potawatomi leader who spent much of his life fighting against American expansion. He also worked closely with Tecumseh during the War of 1812 fighting American settlers near Ohio. The Citadel and Old Exchange Building in Charleston, South Carolina co-hosted this War of 1812 Bicentennial Symposium.

Updated: Saturday, March 16, 2013 at 10:39am (ET)

Related Events

Roots of the War of 1812
Sunday, December 2, 2012     

Bard College History Professor Christian Ayne Crouch looks at the roots of the War of 1812, which she traces back to the Seven Years' War in the 1750s and 1760s. The New York Public Library hosted this event. 

"The War of 1812: Conflict for a Continent"
Saturday, September 1, 2012     

A discussion on the War of 1812 with J.C.A. Stagg, a history professor at the University of Virginia and author of "The War of 1812: Conflict for a Continent." This event was hosted by the Maryland Historical Society.

The War of 1812 in History and Memory
Sunday, June 10, 2012     

History professors Alan Taylor and Nicole Eustace are interviewed about the significance and legacy of what professor Taylor called "The Civil War of 1812" in his Pulitzer Prize winning book on the subject. Nicole Eustace discusses the fact that the war began in a presidential election year, and was the first time a modern democracy formally declared war. The interview was recorded at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians meeting.

The Music of the War of 1812
Saturday, February 18, 2012     

The Battle of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812 inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words that eventually became the "Star Spangled Banner." The Maryland Historical Society hosted music historian David Hildebrand for a look at how the history of the Star Spangled Banner - and how writing and poetry became musical expressions of patriotism during and after the war of 1812.

Myths of the War of 1812 - Donald Hickey
Sunday, April 15, 2012     

This year is the Bicentennial of the start of the War of 1812. Donald Hickey talked about some of the myths that have lingered through history about that war at an event hosted at the Detroit Historical Museum. Mr. Hickey is the author of the book "Don't Give up the Ship! Myths of the War of 1812."

War of 1812 Bicentennial
Saturday, June 16, 2012     

On June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain. Hostilities continued until the Treaty of Ghent was ratified on February 16, 1815. American History TV was LIVE on June 16, 2012, from Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine in Baltimore. Guests included Vincent Vaise, chief of interpretation at Fort McHenry, who talked about the bombardment of the fort and the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner. We also talked with historian Anthony Pitch about the British burning of Washington, DC, in 1814, and New York University professor Nicole Eustace.
 

American Artifacts: War of 1812 in Art & Memory
Sunday, January 13, 2013     

American History TV visited the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery for a look at an unprecedented gathering of portraits and objects representing the major personalities of this little-known war. Curators Sidney Hart and Rachael Penman take us on a guided tour through the collection assembled from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. The War of 1812 technically ended in a draw, but it buoyed American nationalism, birthed the national anthem and Uncle Sam, and anointed a future president in General Andrew Jackson. The exhibit, “1812: A Nation Emerges,” is open at the National Portrait Gallery until January 27, 2013.

The Search for Missing World War II Servicemen
Today     

Author and New York Times Magazine contributing writer, Wil Hylton talks about his book, “Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II." According to Mr. Hylton, the United States is committed to bringing all service members home – even though there are some 83,000 missing. 73,000 of the missing were World War II servicemen. In this talk, Mr. Hylton tells the story of the search for one American bomber plane that disappeared over the tiny Pacific island of Palau in 1944 and he also describes the work being done to find all the missing of World War II. This event was hosted by the New York Public Library. 

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Today     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

History Bookshelf: Capturing Jonathan Pollard
Today     

Former counterintelligence agent Ronald Olive discusses his book, “Capturing Jonathan Pollard: How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice,” which recounts the events leading up to the arrest of the American intelligence analyst convicted of selling secrets to Israel in 1985.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org