All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lincoln & the Emancipation Proclamation

"Lincoln's Last Card" Issuing the Emancipation Proclamation

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 2, 2013

On September 22nd, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, ordering the freeing of slaves in any Confederate state that did not cease fighting and return to the Union within 100 days. No Confederate states returned by the deadline, and Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Louis Masur, author of “Lincoln’s Hundred Days,” talks about his book as well as what led up to the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. He details why the document was issued as an executive order and discusses Lincoln’s changing opinions on slavery and the Union. President Lincoln’s Cottage hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at 2:37pm (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Emancipation During the Civil War
Saturday, November 19, 2011     

Each week, American History TV sits in on a lecture with one of the country’s college professors. Amy Murrell Taylor teaches at the University of Albany, State University of New York, and this class explores the questions of slave emancipation during the Civil War, leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation.

AHTV: Lincoln and Emancipation – New York Reacts
Sunday, February 14, 2010     

In 1862, Abraham Lincoln announced that the Emancipation Proclamation would go into effect on January first, 1863. New York responded by ousting Republicans from state offices, heightened their criticisms of Lincoln and finally rioted against the draft in what became the worst urban rioting in history. The New York Historical Society presented a program about the Emancipation and resulting draft riots.

Abraham Lincoln & Emancipation
Saturday, January 1, 2011     

On January 1st, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Recently, Howard University in Washington, DC held a forum of historians discussing Lincoln, his Emancipation decision, and the impact on the country.
 

Geography of Emancipation
Saturday, October 30, 2010     

Civil War historian Gary Gallagher and University of Richmond president Edward Ayers deliver the keynote address at the 2010 meeting of the Society of Civil War Historians. Their presentation is called "Fighting & Freedom: United States Military Forces and the Geography of Emancipation."

Lectures in History: Emancipation & the Civil War
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

History Professor Chandra Manning looks at the Emancipation Proclamation and the escalation of the Civil War. Professor Manning also examines the role that black soldiers played in the Union victory. The class took place at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

Lectures in History: Emancipation & U.S. Colored Troops
Saturday, August 25, 2012     

History professor Roger Davidson discusses emancipation and U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War. Professor Davidson explains how African Americans used the disorder caused by the Civil War to escape enslavement. He also details how former slaves offered their services to Union forces to help bring about the end of slavery. This class took place at Coppin State University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Emancipation & the Civil War
Tuesday, January 1, 2013     

In this discussion from the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College, history professors and bloggers talk about the debates and controversies of emancipation – its timing, its initial results, and its post-war effects into the 20th century.

The Civil War: Slavery, Emancipation & Reconciliation
Saturday, November 17, 2012     

History professor Caroline Janney addresses how slavery and emancipation played into the process of post-war reconciliation. She also discusses the experiences and memories of Northern and Southern veterans in the war’s aftermath. Ms. Janney spoke at the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

The Civil War: Emancipation Proclamation
Saturday, October 27, 2012     

Historians discuss the circumstances, outcomes, and ongoing considerations of emancipation. They first place President Lincoln’s September 1862 issuance of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation in the context of the War, then broaden out to discuss how Americans think and talk about emancipation and its echoes today. The Smithsonian National Museum of American History hosted this event.

Presidential Vacations
Monday     

American History TV interviewed Lawrence Knutson, author of “Away from the White House: Presidential Escapes, Retreats, and Vacations” about the history and politics of presidential getaways. We feature archival footage released by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library of President Kennedy summering in Cape Cod. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Washington Journal (late 2012)