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Life of Freed Slave Michael Shiner

Page from Shiner's diary about 1862 Emancipation Proclamation

Page from Shiner's diary about 1862 Emancipation Proclamation

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 1, 2014

Historian and genealogist Leslie Anderson takes us on a journey through the diary of Michael Shiner. Born into slavery, Shiner worked as a painter in Washington, DC’s Navy Yard. He gained his freedom in 1840 and later became a prominent black community leader and Republican Party politician. Beginning with the War of 1812, his diary is an account of Washington’s 19th century history. It also chronicles his efforts to save his family from being sold into slavery in Alexandria, Virginia. The Capitol Hill Community Foundation hosted this event. 

Updated: Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10:32am (ET)

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