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Life & Legacy of Civil Rights Leader Medgar Evers

Medgar Evers, 1925-1963

Medgar Evers, 1925-1963

Washington, DC
Saturday, June 8, 2013

Medgar Evers was a Mississippi field officer for the NAACP when he was gunned down in his driveway by a sniper on June 12, 1963. To mark the 50th anniversary of his death, the Newseum hosted a conversation with Evers’ widow Myrlie Evers, former NAACP Chairman Julian Bond, and Jerry Mitchell, an investigative reporter whose work helped convict – some 30 years later – segregationist Byron De La Beckweth in Evers’ murder.

Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013 at 10:32am (ET)

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