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Life Portraits: James Madison

Orange, Virginia
Sunday, March 10, 2013

In this program from our 1999 "American Presidents: Life Portraits" series we focused on James Madison's life and career. Author Jack Rakove talked about Madison's childhood and his education. University of Virginia Research Professor Holly Shulman and Montpelier Executive Director Kathleen Mullins discussed President Madison, his administration, his home and family.

Updated: Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 11:48pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)