All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” Historical Marker

Birmingham, Alabama
Saturday, May 4, 2013

50 years ago, on April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his “Letter from Birmingham Jail” while being held in prison for his involvement in a city-wide civil rights protest called the Birmingham Campaign. King’s daughter, Bernice King, CEO of the King Center in Atlanta, joins Alabama’s governor, Birmingham’s Mayor and others for the unveiling of a historical marker aside the Birmingham Jail.

Updated: Saturday, May 4, 2013 at 2:18pm (ET)

Related Events

Civil Rights & the “Little Rock Nine”
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

Ernest Green, one of the “Little Rock Nine” -- the first nine African American students to attend Little Rock Central High School in 1957 -- talks about his experience in a speech at the annual conference of the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts. The school was the site of forced desegregation in the wake of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. 

Oral Histories: Rev. Joseph Lowery
Saturday, April 6, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key events from the civil rights movement, including the Birmingham Campaign and the March on Washington. Lonnie Bunch, the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, is joined by curator Elaine Nichols to introduce the museum’s Civil Rights Oral History Project, which was conducted in conjunction with the Library of Congress and the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. We’ll then see an oral history interview from that collection with Rev. Joseph Lowery who, along with Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and others, founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Detroit's Civil Rights Movement, 1950-1967
Saturday, October 27, 2012     

The Detroit Historical Society's Black Historic Sites Committee hosts a panel discussion on the city's Civil Rights movement from 1950 to 1967. Panelists include a woman who was arrested during the Detroit riot of 1967, when hundreds of people were injured and 43 people died.

Civil Rights and Oral History
Saturday, July 28, 2012     

Tom Ikeda of the Japanese American Legacy Project and Jasmine Alinder of the March on Milwaukee digital history project are interviewed at the Organization of American Historians meeting in Milwaukee.  Ikeda and Alinda discuss the historical value of online oral and digital history collections. Mr. Ikeda's project focuses on documenting the experience of the WWII Japanese internment camps, and Professor Alinder is a team member of a project detailing the 1960's civil rights movement in Milwaukee.

Lectures in History: The Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, June 2, 2012     

University of Washington American History Professor Quintard Taylor looks at the Civil Rights Movement from the 1940s through the 1960s.  Professor Taylor focuses on the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Brown v. Board of Education and the 1957 integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Stokely Carmichael & the Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, March 30, 2013     

Tufts University history professor, Peniel Joseph, talks about his working biography of Stokely Carmichael at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. Mr. Joseph argues that Carmichael played an important role in the 1960s Civil Rights movement, working as a bridge between many factions advocating for equal rights for African Americans.

Lectures in History: Martin Luther King Jr. in Birmingham, Alabama
Monday, January 21, 2013     

University of Hartford professor Warren Goldstein discusses Martin Luther King, Jr.'s time spent in Birmingham, Alabama, and the Civil Rights movement there in 1963.

Recorded History of the U.S. Congress
Sunday     

2014 marks the 225th anniversary of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. As part of the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government, past and present House and Senate historians came together to discuss the state of congressional history. They explored current projects to retrieve old records from individual members of Congress as well as the many differences between the first Congress and Congress today. 

American Artifacts: Making & Breaking Secret Codes
Sunday     

American History TV visits the National Cryptologic Museum - located on the campus of the National Security Agency, just north of Washington, DC - to learn about the making and breaking of secret codes, and their role in U.S. history. This two-part program includes a look at the breaking of the German “Enigma” code and the Japanese diplomatic and naval codes in World War II. 

Theodore Roosevelt and the Great War
Sunday     

Historian J. Lee Thompson discusses Theodore Roosevelt’s views on World War I and his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s neutrality policy. Roosevelt’s four sons served in the military during the war – his youngest, a pilot named Quentin, was shot down and killed over France in 1918. Roosevelt never recovered from his son’s death and died six months later in January 1919. Thompson is a Lamar University professor and author of Never Call Retreat: Theodore Roosevelt and the Great War.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN's Video Library
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org