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Lee Harvey Oswald & the Kennedy Assassination

Former Texas School Book Depository

Former Texas School Book Depository

Dallas
Sunday, August 25, 2013

Buell Wesley Frazier worked at the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas and would give Lee Harvey Oswald rides to work, including on Nov. 22, 1963, the day of President Kennedy's assassination. In this program, he offers his remembrances of Mr. Oswald and the day of the president's murder. The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas, hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, August 26, 2013 at 10:46am (ET)

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